6 REASONS WHY IT’S A GREAT TIME TO BUY

The housing market is looking healthier. Here are six reasons why now is the time to jump into the market.

1. Uncle Sam is willing to help. First-time buyers (defined as anyone who hasn’t owned a home in the last three years) are entitled to a maximum $8,000 tax credit; interest rates are at record lows; and the Federal Reserve is doing its best to make mortgage loans available.

2. People have to live somewhere. About 800,000 new households are formed each year in this country, ensuring that the housing market will tighten, even if the economy doesn’t soar.

3. Borrowers leverage their investment. If you put $10,000 into the stock market and it earns 10 percent, you’ve earned $1,000. If you put $10,000 down on a home and its values increases 10 percent, you’ve made $10,000.

4. When prices come back up, you’ll have instant equity. In parts of the country where foreclosures have driven down prices, better times will mean the price of the home you buy will rise rapidly.

5. Mortgage costs stay the same. If you get a fixed-rate mortgage, the monthly payment stays the same – while everything else, including rent, goes upward.

6. You own it. There is something comforting in the notion that your home is your own. You can paint it any color you want, let the dog run in the back yard and hang a swing for the kids in the front.

BUYING FORECLOSURES AT THE AUCTION

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Buying foreclosures from the County Courthouse steps is a lucrative and exciting full time business. Some of the wealthiest men in Colorado made their fortunes at these foreclosure sales. You must know 4 key things before you EVER attempt to make a purchase at one of these foreclosures auctions.

1. Take careful notes of the condition of the home the day before or two days before the foreclosures sale date. A lot can happen to an empty foreclosure home over time. It may not be in the same condition when it finally goes up for a foreclosure sale.

2. Make sure to pull a title report on the foreclosure sale property weeks before the auction. You need to know what loans and liens are placed against the property. Many of these liens will be wiped out at the foreclosures sale, but MANY will not. And probably most importantly, the position (rank) of the lender that you are paying off in the auction dictates which loans and liens will be wiped off and which will not. Knowing the position that you are buying into is critical. Conducting a title search beforehand will help you determine that position and the risk involved in buying the property. Many title companies will do a semi title search for you for FREE if you promise them your business in the future.

3. Foreclosure sales are a place of great competition at times. You must know your top number BEFORE you walk into the foreclosure sale. This number should take into account the cost of the repairs (that you double checked yesterday!), the cost of holding the property, and your expected sales price. DO NOT BID OVER YOUR TOP NUMBER! It can be easy to get caught up in a competition with another bidder. Do not get emotional. Walk away when the bidding has gone over your number.

4. Keep information on foreclosure sales that get postponed on the day that they were supposed to go to auction. Bankruptcies, seller negotiations, family issues, and lender leniency can all cause a foreclosure sale to be postponed. Track these homes and the new date that the sale has been postponed to. Other investors may not keep this information and will be caught off guard when the new future sale date arrives. That is one less investor competing against you for that foreclosure sale. Sometimes that is all it takes.

TIPS FOR FIRST TIME HOME BUYERS

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1. What are the benefits? You should buy a home. That’s what your friends & family tells you. So by now, you’ve weighed the benefits & decided that home ownership is the best decision for you.

2. Define your search criteria. Most searches start on the internet. Buyers can see hundreds of virtual listings, pictures, virtual tours, & aerial shots of homes & neighborhoods. Buyers should know what town, school district, number of bedrooms, square footage, etc. will work best for them. Drive around different towns & explore. Walk down the street of the downtown area to get a feel for the town. Do you fit in? Can you see yourself living here?

3. How long should the process take? Right now (Fall, 2008), it’s a buyer’s market. A motivated buyer should be able to find a house in a few weeks. Some buyers can find a house within a few days. It all depends on what you’re used to. If you live in a cardboard box on the sidewalk, most of the houses you see will look good. If you live in a penthouse in the Plaza Hotel, you may have more picky tastes. Find a good real estate agent & have them show you homes based on your search criteria. The narrower your search criteria is, the faster you’ll find you home & the better able you’ll be to analyze the homes to find the best deal.

4. How many homes should I see? Don’t see more than 7 homes in 1 day, or your brain will be on overload. Take notes on the listing sheet about the homes you see. Good or bad? Rank the homes you’ve seen in order, so you’ll always have something on the top of the list that all other houses should be compared to.

5. Compare & contrast. Bring a digital camera & start with a close-up of the house number to identify each group of home photos. Take notes of unusual features, colors, & design elements. Pay attention to the home’s surroundings. What is next door? Down the block? Do you like the location? Is it near a park? Train Station? Is there road noise from a highway? Are there high tension power lines above the house?

6. Always look at some houses twice before making an offer. Look carefully & don’t overlook any closet or attic or basement. Remember the three most important rules of real estate: location, location, location. Try to buy the cheapest house on the block, not the most expensive. Remember your exit strategy; make sure other people will want to buy this house when you are ready to sell. Colonials are the most desirable type of home. Raised ranches are the least desirable. Other important items that affect value: flat driveway, flat usable property, non-double yellow line road, no road noise nearby, close to railroad, etc.

7. Don’t let your realtor influence your decision. It’s not their choice; they won’t be living in the house. Make sure that your agent points out any defects that you may have overlooked. Get an inspection before buying.

21 WAYS TO SAVE ON YOUR REMODEL

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1. Increase efficiency, not size. If you can reorganize and equip your kitchen for maximum utility, you may not need to blow out the walls to gain square footage. Start by replacing space-hogging shelves with cabinet-height pullout drawers 8 inches wide, containing racks for canned goods and other items. “You’re getting three or more horizontal planes where you might otherwise get only one,” says Louis Smith Jr., an architect with Meier Group, in Ann Arbor, Michigan. You could easily shell out a few thousand to outfit cabinets with upgrades like dividers, pull-out pot trays, and lazy Susan’s, but you’ll save many times that amount by skipping the addition you thought you needed. *Cost to expand kitchen by 200 square feet: $48,000 to $95,000 Cost of super-efficient, custom-designed cabinets: $35,000 SAVED: Up to $60,000

2. Bring in natural light without adding windows. Before cutting a big hole in the side of your house and rearranging the framing, consider less invasive and less expensive ways of capturing light. To brighten up a windowless bath or hallway, for instance, you can install a “light tube,” which slips between roof rafters and funnels sunshine down into the living space. Cost to add a double-pane insulated window: $1,500 Cost for a light tube: $500 SAVED: $1,000

3. Hit the recycling center. Do-it-yourselfers can reap big savings with recycled or lightly used fixtures and building materials. Habitat for Humanity operates about 400 ReStores nationwide, which offer salvaged materials at half off home-center prices. One caveat: Many contractors won’t work with salvaged items or homeowner–supplied materials in general, because they don’t want to assume the liability if something goes wrong. That said, if you’re doing your own work, you can find anything from pre-hung doors to acrylic skylights to partial bundles of insulation. (To find a ReStore near you, visit habitat.org.) Price of 4×5 foot insulated window in a home center: $600 Price at ReStore: $300 SAVED: $300

4. Donate your trash. Before you begin a remodeling job, invite the local Habitat for Humanity chapter to remove materials and fixtures for later resale. “About 85 percent of a house is reusable,” says B.J. Perkins, Habitat’s ReUse program manager, in Austin, Texas. “We can do a total takedown, or do a cherry-pick job and take the cabinets, the tub, the sink, and so on.” You save space in the landfill, collect a charitable tax credit for the donation, and help a good cause. Visit Habitat’s website (see Way to Save #3) to find an affiliate near you. Cost to trash a suite of bathroom fixtures: $50 to $75 Cost to donate: Nothing, plus you get a tax deduction SAVED: Space in the landfill (and a little bit of your soul)

5. Do your own demo. Knocking down may not be as costly as rebuilding, but you can still shave dollars by doing some of the demolition yourself, as long as you proceed with care. “If a homeowner wants to demo a deck, well, I am sure they can handle that,” says Michael Winn, owner of Winn Design, in Virginia. “But when it comes to interior spaces, I would dissuade them from doing it unless they have done it before.” The reason: A reckless wrecker might unwittingly take out a load-bearing wall or, worse still, plunge a reciprocating saw into live wiring or pressurized plumbing. (For tips on how to do demo right, see our October 2005 feature, “Before You Construct, You Have to Destruct.”) Cost to demo a 200 square foot deck yourself: $450 (Dumpster rental and parking permit) Cost for a pro: $1,000 SAVED: $550

6. Consider long term costs, not just short term gains. If your addition calls for clapboard siding, for instance, you can save more in the long run by ponying up now for the pre-primed and pre-painted variety. It costs an extra 10 to 20 cents per foot, but “you’ll wind up paying for half as many paint jobs down the road,” says Paul Eldrenkamp, owner of Byggmeister, a design build remodeling firm in Newton, Massachusetts. The reason? Factory finishes are applied on dry wood under controlled conditions: no rain, no harsh sun. “I used prefinished claps on my house about ten years ago and the only flaw in the finish is the occasional mildew spot, easily washed off,” Eldrenkamp says. “The paint looks as if it’ll be good for another ten years, easily.” Cost of unfinished siding for a 10×40 foot addition, plus two paint jobs: $5,000 Cost for prefinished claps and one coat of paint at installation: $3,750 SAVED: $1,250

7. Tap your contractor’s sources. When it comes to things like flooring, ask your subcontractor if he has odds and ends stock left over from other jobs. While renovating a Civil War era bed and breakfast in New Jersey some years back, contractor Bill Asdal needed wood flooring. He made a few phone calls and came up with hundreds of square feet of hardwood, in various lengths and widths, that otherwise would have gone into the trash on other job sites. Just by planning it to uniform thickness, then sanding and refinishing it, he saved his client almost $9,000 in materials costs. Cost of new flooring: $19,200 Cost to use someone else’s discards: $10,500 SAVED: $8,700

8. Limit recessed light fixtures. “The more recessed lights you put in, the more it’s going to cost,” says Tom Silva, This Old House’s general contractor. In addition to the fixtures, there’s the labor to cut all the holes and insulate them properly. A wall or ceiling mounted light can also deliver more wattage, which means you may be able to get away with fewer fixtures. Cost to install six can lights: $900 Cost to install one surface mounted fixture of equal wattage: $300 SAVED: $600

9. Consult an architect. Depending on the scale of your project, you might not need a full on architectural commission, which involves extensive meetings, multiple job site visits, and several sets of construction drawings, to the tune of about 8 percent of a project’s construction budget. You might be able to tap an architect’s design savvy by having him undertake a one-time design consultation. For example, for a $400 flat fee, Baton Rouge architect Kevin Harris will meet with a homeowner, examine the problem, and sketch out a few solutions that could be as simple as opening up a partition wall or moving a door. The homeowner can then give the sketch to a builder or take it to a drafting service, which will charge about $1 to $1.50 a square foot to crank out formal construction drawings. Architect’s fee to design a 300 square foot home office: $2,250 Fee for design consultation only and plans: $580 SAVED: $1,670

10. Partner with a contractor. Though the practice is controversial among the trades, some contractors will offer consulting and mentoring services to skilled do it yourselfers on an hourly basis. Chicago area builder Ted Welch charges $150 per hour for such coaching, with a two hour minimum commitment. “The most satisfied clients tend to be those who have good manual dexterity, who realizes that skills need to be practiced in order to be perfected, and who are willing to risk making a few mistakes and then learn from them,” he says. Cost to drywall one room: $1,000 Cost with DIY consultation: $300 (2 hours of coaching), plus materials SAVED: $700

11. Make sweat equity count. Unless you’ve got loads of time (and expertise) to spend on your project, the best way to add sweat equity is up front, by handling your own demolition, or at the back end, by doing some of the finish work yourself. “If you want to save money, dig in and start helping out,” says Tom Silva. “You can insulate, you can paint, you can sand.” Or better still, he says, help with cleanup every day. “Instead of paying someone to pick up sawdust off the floor, put your money into the time it takes to trim the window properly,” he advises. Cost for construction crew to handle cleanup: $200 per day Cost to do it yourself: $0 SAVED: About 3 to 5 percent of the overall job cost

12. Do your own schlepping. If you’re doing your own project, slash your materials delivery fees by picking up goods yourself. No pickup truck? For about $400, you can purchase a nearly new single axle utility trailer online, which you can tow behind your SUV. Get one just big enough to carry 4×8 sheet goods flat. Use it for a half dozen trips, and it’s paid for itself. Find trailers for sale near you via eBay Motors, or try your local classifieds. Cost of 10 deliveries: $750 Cost to buy a used trailer: $400 SAVED: $350, plus you get to keep (or sell) the trailer

13. Don’t overspend on wall prep. If your walls are in such rough shape that it would take a painting contractor days of filling and sanding to make them ready for the roller, consider using materials such as Texturglas, from Deerfield Beach, Florida based company Roos International. A breathable, nontoxic wall covering made of fine glass filaments; Texturglas has a similar look and feel to the fiberglass matting used in auto body work. It’s available in a variety of surface patterns, takes paint readily, and is designed to be installed right on top of existing surfaces, adding strength while covering up dings. Cost to patch and paint a 15×20 foot room with heavily damaged walls: $1,525 Cost to install Texturglas: $1,050 SAVED: $475

14. Consider look a likes. Some imitations just make sense: Lumber giant Weyerhaeuser sells a fast-growing natural eucalyptus hybrid under the brand name Lyptus. Sustainably harvested in plantations in Brazil, the clear grained hardwood looks and feels remarkably like mahogany. It’s sold as tongue and groove flooring and in planks and sheets for cabinetry and millwork. (Visit Lyptus.com to find a distributor near you.) Cost of 100 board feet of mahogany: $808 Cost of same quantity Lyptus: $395 SAVED: $413

15. Demolish the whole house and start from scratch. “Most clients don’t want to hear those words,” says Paul Irwin, design director with Landis Construction, in the Washington, D.C., area, “but it really needs to be considered on major remodels. “In one case, for example, plans for a 1,300 square foot addition revealed that the house’s existing foundation wasn’t up to code and would have to be replaced, a $30,000 proposition. After crunching the numbers, the owners concluded that it would cost as much to update the house, a former summer cottage, as it would to reproduce it new. “For a relatively small additional cost,” says the owner, “we get all the benefits of new construction while preserving the character and feel of our old house.” Cost to remodel: $570,000 Cost to replicate: $588,000 SAVED: For $18,000, the owners gained as much as $60,000 worth of new living space, plus improved safety and energy efficiency.

16. Wait until contractors want your business. Don’t schedule your renovation in the height of summer or between September, when the kids go back to school, and Christmas. “That’s premium time,” explains Lisa Stacholy, owner of LKS Architects, in Atlanta, Georgia. Suppliers tend to be busier, labor scarcer, and deliveries slower. One Virginia based contractor offers discounts of between 4.5 and 5.5 percent (depending on the overall budget) on projects during his down time, right after the New Year. Cost of a major bathroom remodel in peak season: $25,000 Cost in January: $23,625 SAVED: $1,375

17. Skip the foundation. If local code allows, you may be able to support a small addition on posts and beams, as you would a deck, explains contractor Dennis Gavin, of Gavin Design–Build, in Media, Pennsylvania. 220 square foot addition with poured foundation: $40,000 Same size addition on posts and beams: $35,000 SAVED: $5,000

18. Don’t move the kitchen sink, or the toilet, if you can avoid it. “That often becomes the biggest part of the plumbing price increase,” says Richard Trethewey, This Old House plumbing and heating expert. If your new layout requires that you move the toilet, use the opportunity to upgrade the pipes at the same time. “That will save you money in the long run,” says Richard. Cost to move toilet more than 3 feet: $500-$1,000 Cost to leave in existing location: $0 SAVED: Up to $1,000

19. Plan with stock sizes in mind. “Ask yourself, ‘Why am I building something 10 feet wide if plywood comes in 4 foot wide sheets?'” says Lisa Stacholy, of LKS Architects, in Atlanta. The same applies to stock windows and doors: Use manufacturers’ off–the–shelf dimensions from the outset and you will save the premiums of custom fabrication. Cost of custom doors: $1,500-$2,500 Cost of standard doors: $500-$800 SAVED: Up to $2,000

20. Buy building supplies at auction. Brian Peppel, a homeowner in Phoenixville, Pennsylvania, attends one building supply auction each month in nearby Lancaster County. His recent finds include two pallets of concrete block for $10 and a solid–wood prehung exterior door for $65. “Their inventory is everything under the sun, a lot of scratch and dent, misordered custom items, or new overstock supplies,” reports Peppel. He once watched the auctioneer’s gavel fall on a large, custom–made triangular window with an original retail value that he pegs at several thousand dollars. The winning bid? $1. Cost of solid cherry wall cabinet at a home center: $300 Cost at building supply auction: $10 SAVED:$290

21. Make decisions early. Start prowling the aisles at the hardware store or home center way before the wrecking crew shows up. Get a good feeling for what you want in fixtures and appliances and what they cost. If you aren’t absolutely specific up front about what you want, you’ll have to rely on your contractor’s estimate, called an allowance, and his notion of what is acceptable may be quite different from yours. “Ninety eight percent of the time, allowances are too low,” says Tom Silva. For instance, you may have had a glass–tile backsplash in mind, but your contractor’s bid was for ceramic. Cost to plan ahead: $0 Cost of change orders midstream: The difference in the item price, but also time lost to project delays and communications glitches SAVED: Up to thousands.

How to Prepare Your “Home For Sale”

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What more could you want than to get your home sold for top dollar in short order without any hassles? If you take a moment and read through the following suggestions before you put your property on the market, you will be on your way to a successful sale.

 

Drive-up Appeal

Trim trees and shrubs, clean out flower beds and invest in a few flats of colorful flowers, paint the front door, make sure doorbell is working properly, wash the mailbox, keep the porch swept and get an attractive mat for people to wipe their feet.

 

Absolute Basics

  • §  Start by airing out the home. Most people are turned off by even the smallest odor. Odors must be eliminated, especially if you have dogs, cats or young children in diapers or if you are a smoker.
  • §  Wash all the windows in the house, inside and out.
  • §  If it has been over a year since the carpets have been cleaned, now is the time to do it. Bare floors should also be waxed or polished.
  • §  Put bright light bulbs in every socket made for a bulb. Buyers like bright and cheery homes.
  • §  Clean out closets, cabinets and drawers. Closets should look as if they have enough room to hold additional items. Get everything off the floor and don’t have the shelves piled to the ceiling.
  • §  Make sure there is not too much furniture in a room. Select pieces that look best, and put others in the garage or storage.
  • §  Go over the kitchen like a health inspector. Clean the oven, range (new drip pans) and the seal of the dishwasher door.
  • §  Bathtubs, showers and sinks should be freshly caulked. The grout should be clean and in good condition. There should be no leaks in the faucets or traps.

 

A Few Unrelated Suggestions

  • §  If you have limited counter space in the kitchen, keep unnecessary items put away.
  • §  Keep children’s toys out of the front yard, sidewalks and front porch.
  • §  Recognize the difference between decorator touches and clutter or sterility.
  • §  Clean the ashes out of the fireplace.
  • §  Make sure that the pull-down staircase is working correctly. Be sure there is a light in the attic.
  • §  The pool needs to be sparkling and free of leaves.

 

For those Willing To Go the Extra Mile

  • §  There are some things you can do that will add flair to your home. If your home is the least bit dated, you may want to replace wallpaper in the entry, kitchen and bathrooms and consider replacing outdated light fixtures.
  • §  Fresh paint on interior and/or exterior where needed.
  • §  New appliances in the kitchen can be an exciting feature that can actually make the difference in a buyer choosing your home over another.

 

Showing Your Home

  • §  When you leave the house in the morning or during the day, leave it as if you know it is going to be shown.
  • §  Turn off the radio or television. Leave soft music playing.
  • §  Keep pets out of the way—preferably out of the house. Many people are acutely uncomfortable around some animals and may even be allergic to them.
  • §  Leave your premises. Take a short break while your home is being shown. Buyers are intimidated when sellers are present and tend to hurry through the house. Let the buyer be at ease, and let the agents do their job.

 

Finding Your Ideal Neighborhood

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If you’re in the market for a home this year, look beyond its’ four walls and directly at your neighbors. Thoroughly check out a prospective neighborhood before plunking down hundreds of thousands of your hard-earned dollars. If you want to get the real dirt on your neighborhood, you’re going to have to do some digging. So dust off your trench coat and dark glasses, and get ready to go on a sleuthing expedition.

1. Contact the community association for the neighborhood you are considering. Often, it publishes newsletters, holds meetings, or sponsors community activities, all of which hold potentially useful bits of information about your neighborhood.

2. Subscribe to the local paper or call and ask for a sample of back issues.

3. Locate the community hang-outs. Is there a neighborhood pool or community center? If so, try and visit so you can get a sense of who lives in the area and whether there is a strong community feel.

4. Look for sidewalks. For some, living in a part of the neighborhood with no sidewalks means many things: not as many walks (and therefore don’t meet and greet the neighbors), young kids have fewer safe places to ride their bikes, and it seems to prevent other folks from walking much, too.

5. Visit the neighborhood at different times of the day and at least once on a weekend rather than a weekday. Are most of the folks working out of the home? Is the neighborhood composed of retirees? Are there loads of school-aged children? Are there many young mothers with babies and toddlers?

6. Study a map of your neighborhood to see the proximity of parks, libraries, the nearest hospital, and other amenities. Likewise, try driving different routes to the home so you can see the good, the bad, and the ugly in the surrounding area.

7. Arrange a visit to the school your children would attend, check out the school’s test scores, and find out how many veteran teachers are on staff.

8. Talk to the neighbors and ask them very specific questions. For example, you may want to ask about their perceptions of crime, location, noise, traffic, and community feeling. Is the neighborhood changing? If so, how?

9. Head down to city hall to check on issues with zoning or find out about any projects in the works. You should be able to find out if there are any major road or construction projects planned for the next few years.

10. Pump your real estate agent for information. How long do homes in this area stay on the market? What’s their resale potential?

11. Check your town or city’s website for real estate tax assessment information. By looking at our local real estate tax office website, I can see the value of the assessment, how much of that total is land versus the structure, how the assessor rated the structure’s condition, and recent home sales in the area.

12. Head to the nearest police station to ask for crime rate information. Be sure to ask about the typical response time for emergencies.

13. Check the national registry for sex offenders. Once you’ve gathered as much information as you can, review it. Does the neighborhood seem to meet your needs? Did you find any information that’s a deal breaker? Can you picture yourself living here happily? Be as picky as you can afford to be; no returns or exchanges are offered on neighborhoods.

“9 Critical Steps” to take when selling your home!

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Selling your Colorado home takes a lot more than adding it to the MLS listings and putting a sign in the front yard.  There are nine critical areas that must be addressed to ensure that you get the best results when selling your home.  Here are the “9 critical Steps” that I do for my Selling clients to save them time,  potential hassle – and to ensure that their homes sell quickly , and for top value!

 

1.         COMMUNICATION

  • -Education – It is important to remain educated and up-to-date on listing and current market conditions in your area. That is why I suggest you stay connected to our auto- feed and receive all weekly and monthly blogs about market conditions and home sales.
  • -Keeping You Informed – Provide updates on all activity regarding your home: agent showings, open house attendance, and agent tours and sign inquiries.

2.         PREPARING YOUR HOME FOR SALE

  • -Home Preparation – Suggest constructive changes to your home to make it more appealing, and a sale more likely, to interested buyers.
  • -Home Staging – Present you with professional advice on presenting your home to show exceptionally well, and sell for the highest possible value.

3.         PROMOTING YOUR HOME TO REAL ESTATE AGENTS

  • -MLS Exposure – Submit your home listing for exposure to over 15,000 active agents in the Colorado Front Range Multiple Listing Service (MLS) system.
  • -Agent Tours – Place your home on the weekly schedule for preview by agents specifically interested in property in your area with motivated buyers.
  • -Personal Promotion to Agents – Create a custom publicity E-flyer about your home for personal distribution to each active agent in the community.
  • -Exposure to the Real Estate Board and Point 2 Agents- Promote your home by distributing flyers, brochures, and making personal announcements at real estate board meetings. Currently we have handshake agreements with over 400 Colorado agents to promote your home. Agents are added daily.

4.         PROMOTING YOUR HOME ON THE INTERNET

  • -We will design and build a “Personalized Custom Property Web Site” just for your property. You will be able to email it to your friends and family and we will provide access to the site on the MLS, Zillow and hundreds of other internet sites.
  • -We are “Premier Zillow Agents” making your home a featured home on Zillow.com. Once you list with us your home is a featured home on Zillow for the millions of buyers looking for their perfect home.
  • -Internet Exposure on Google – Generate no less than 500 page viewings per month on our website through Google search engine featuring your property.
  • -Internet Exposure on Yahoo – Generate at least 500 website page views through the search engine Yahoo, using the sponsored search program each month.
  • -Virtual Home Tour – Prepare a professional virtual home tour and selling feature presentation for your home so that buyers can experience the uniqueness of your home 24 hours a day.  We will have quality material with which to market your home.

5.         PROMOTING YOUR HOME IN YOUR LOCAL AREA

  • -Neighborhood Promotion – Send a personalized letter to residents in your neighborhood promoting the features and lifestyle benefits of your home.
  • -Toll-Free Telephone Promotion – Include your property in the PROQUEST 800# Marketing Program so that prospective buyers can listen 24 hours a day about the virtues of your home.
  • -Target Market Promotion – Promote your home in the industry specific Newsletter “Your Home Club” that is mailed twice a month to more than 1000 prospects in your market area.

6.         ADVERTISING YOUR HOME

  • -Print Advertising – To promote your home as part of the Real Estate Book.  This publication has country-wide circulation with millions of readers, and, it is available online.
  • -Local Advertising – Advertise your property in local community newspapers with targeted circulation.
  • -Custom Home Descriptions – Create a custom flyer of features and lifestyle benefits of your home for use by cooperating agents showing your home.

7.         SHOWING YOUR HOME

  • -Centralized Showing Service – Automated showing service allowing for only approved / verified and vetted real estate agents with their clients gain access to your property.
  • -Custom Listing Book – Create a custom “listing book” to be placed in your home for buyers to reference home features, lot, utility, and tax information, neighborhood benefits, schools, shopping, medical, and other buyer benefits.
  • -Easy Access for Showings – Enhance convenience of buyer viewing by placing home on a lock box.
  • -Open House Promotions – Promote your home to the public through Open Houses, at your convenience.
  • -Professional Signs – Maximize showing exposure through professional signage.

8.         MANAGING HOME BUYER “LEADS”

  • -Tracking Interest – Track all home showing agents and public using special sign-in sheets.
  • -Potential Buyer Motivation – Follow-up on all agents who have shown your home to answer questions, and further motivate buyer interest.

9.         MANAGING THE TRANSACTION

  • -Potential Buyer Evaluation – Ensure that any offers from buyers are pre-qualified and capable of closing on the purchase.
  • -Negotiations – Represent you in contract negotiations with buyers to help generate the highest selling price for the home.
  • -Managing the Closing – Coordinate escrow, financing, and closing activities on your behalf to ensure a smooth, hassle-free closing.

 

DENVER SEES A RISE IN THE HOUSING MARKET

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The Denver real estate market is heading into fall very strong.  A reported 2,500 homes came to the market this past summer.  The market is moving towards equilibrium of homes being bought and sold boosting local economy.  But with a boost in the market we are also seeing a rise in housing prices.  According to the Metrolist the average price of a Denver Metro home was $310,000.

The Denver Post reported in August that there was a 43% decrease in foreclosures from July, causing sales from discounted property to diminish.

If you are interested in selling your current house or need help finding your dream home contact King Real Estate Group. King Real Estate Group offers their clients professional, knowledgeable, and innovative real estate services.   For more information about real estate trends visit our website at:  KingRealEstateGroup  .